Internships

Internship Program at Nevada State

Every student should consider completing an internship at least once during their college career. Participating in an internship provides hands-on experience in a field of interest and allows students to apply skills in a professional environment. Internships also help expand a professional network and build a resume. Additionally, data from the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE), show that students who participate in at least one internship during college have a higher chance of securing a full-time job after graduation and are significantly more likely to receive multiple full-time job offers (2019).

Internship Information for Students

Internship Basics & Frequently Asked Questions

What is an internship?

An internship is a form of experiential learning that integrates knowledge and theory learned in the classroom with practical application and skills development in a professional setting. Internships give students the opportunity to gain valuable applied experience and make connections in professional fields they are considering for career paths; and give employers the opportunity to guide and evaluate talent (NACE 2018)

To ensure that an experience—whether it is a traditional internship or one conducted remotely or virtually—is educational, and thus eligible to be considered a legitimate internship by the NACE definition, all the following criteria must be met:

  1. The experience must be an extension of the classroom: a learning experience that provides for applying the knowledge gained in the classroom. It must not be simply to advance the operations of the employer or be the work that a regular employee would routinely perform.
  2. The skills or knowledge learned must be transferable to other employment settings.
  3. The experience has a defined beginning and end, and a job description with desired qualifications.
  4. There are clearly defined learning objectives/goals related to the professional goals of the student’s academic coursework.
  5. There is supervision by a professional with expertise and educational and/or professional background in the field of the experience.
  6. There is routine feedback by the experienced supervisor. 
  7. There are resources, equipment, and facilities provided by the host employer that support learning objectives/goals.

How is an internship different than other types of experiences?

Internships:

  • Who: for current college students and sometimes recent alumni
  • Where: can be at for-profit and non-profit locations
  • How Long: are temporary positions typically lasting 3-6 months
  • When: have set start and end dates that typically align with a student’s academic calendar
  • Compensation: can be paid or unpaid
  • Academic Relevancy: needs to align with student’s academic major/minor and career goals

Jobs:

  • Who: anyone can hold a job at any time as long as they are of legal age to hold employment and have work authorization
  • Where: can be at for-profit or non-profit
  • How Long: can last as long as both the employee and employer are satisfied
  • When: most often do not have set end dates
  • Compensation: always paid
  • Academic Relevancy: does not need to align with academic major/minor or career goals

Volunteering:

  • Who: anyone can volunteer at almost any age and time in life
  • Where: mostly at non-profits
  • How Long: can be temporary or long-term, depending on individual availability and need from the organization
  • When: most often will not have set start and end dates
  • Compensation: always unpaid, you are freely offering to do something without payment, typically for a cause
  • Academic Relevancy: does not need to align with academic major/minor or career goals

Apprenticeships:

  • Who: for students at vocational or trade schools, not at universities or colleges
  • Where: typically completed in trade industries such as carpentry, plumbing
  • How Long: are temporary, but last anywhere from 6 months to 4+ years
  • When: will likely have set and end dates, but not necessarily tied to an academic calendar
  • Compensation: always paid, work is directly tied to paid employment
  • Academic Relevancy: directly tied to academic program, will receive recognized educational certificate

What will the time commitment look like?

Typically, students can expect to intern with an employer on average for 3-4 months at 8-12 hours/ week. However, the time commitment for each individual intern can depend on a variety of factors including but not limited to; if you are completing an internship for academic credit, your schedule/availability, internship employer’s hours of operations.

No matter where or when an internship takes place, it is important that you communicate with an employer regarding your availability and internship schedule upon initial communication and throughout the course of the internship to make sure you have a mutual understanding of the time you can commit.

It is also important to consider other personal commitments and abilities as internships can require a lot of time and energy. We want to make sure that while taking part in an internship, you are also able to take care of yourself and do well in your other courses. Before jumping into an internship, you should consider:

  • Your course schedule
  • Other jobs or volunteer roles
  • Location of internship – how far will you need to drive to get there?
  • Reliable transportation (if internship is in person)
  • Intern employers hours of operations- will that align with your schedule?

Are internships paid?

It depends!

Most often, internships at non-profits are unpaid. On the other hand, paid internships are most commonly seen at for-profit companies/organizations. However, not every for-profit will offer interns pay.

We do encourage all of our employers to pay our interns if they are able to.

If you have questions about internship compensation, or if the ability to be compensated as an intern is a barrier to completing an internship, please talk to the Internship Manager about your options. Likely, seeking out part-time or full-time employment is a safe option as it will ensure you are receiving compensation and will last longer compared to an internship which is meant to be a temporary experience (3-6 months).

When do internships take place?

Internships take place all year-round. Because internships are meant to help bridge knowledge learned in the classroom to hands-on experiences, most internships follow the academic calendar:

  • Fall from August to December
  • Spring from January to May
  • Summer from June to August

Again, the specific time and length on the internship will depend factors such as: your availability, employer expectations, and if you are taking an internship for academic credit.

For-credit vs. non-credit internships

For-Credit

A for-credit internship is an internship that is taken in conjunction with an internship course and is recorded on a student’s academic transcript. Internship courses at NSC can range from 1-4 credits, depending on the academic discipline. For every 1 credit that a student receives for their internship, the student is expected to complete approx. 45 hours of work at their internship over the course of the entire semester in which the internship and internship course take place. (ex: 3 credits= 140 hours).

The majority of the work you will do for your internship course is you actually going out and completing hours at your internship. The faculty who teach the courses may have you complete small assignments for the course that relate to your internship such as reflections or evaluations of your experience, but most of your time will be spent at your internship site completing internship duties rather than in a classroom like a traditional college course.

If you wish to receive academic credit for your internship, your internship must take place in the same semester you are enrolled in your internship course. For example, you cannot complete an internship over the summer and then enroll in an internship course and receive retroactive credit for the following fall semester.

See “For-Credit Internships at NSC” section for more information on receiving academic credit for your internship. 

Non-Credit

A non-credit internship (an internship without receiving academic credit and enrolling in an internship course), is an internship that is arranged between you and the employer. These internships are not recorded on your transcript since you are not receiving academic credit.

This option allows students who do not need, want or are able to receive academic credit to still complete an internship experience to strengthen their skills for future employment.

If you pursue this option, we highly recommend reporting your non-credit internship to the Career Services Internship Manager via our Non-Credit Internship Reporting Form. By informing Career Services of your internship, we will be able to provide you with support and assistance through your internship, should any issues arise.

For-Credit Internships at NSC

Internship course options

If you are a School of Nursing or School of Education student, please see the “School of Nursing Students” or School of Education Students” dropdowns as you will have specific hands-on learning requirements as a part of your curriculum.

The following major and minor programs in Liberal Arts & Sciences currently offer internship courses at NSC:

  • Biology (BIOL 399= 1-4 credits)
  • Business Administration (BUS 491= 1-4 credits)
  • Criminal Justice (CRJ 491= 3 credits)
  • Counseling (COU 497= 4 credits)
  • Communication (COM 499= 3 credits)
  • Environmental Resource Science (NRES 416= 1-4 credits)
  • History/ History Pre-Law (not currently an active course)
  • Interpreting (AM 450= 3 credits)
  • Psychology (PSY 497= 4 credits)
  • Visual Media (VIS 499= 3 credits)

Important Internship Course Information:

There is no guarantee that these courses will be offered each semester. Refer to the class schedule to when internship courses are offered. Also be sure to refer to the course catalog to see any required prerequisites to enrolling in the course. All internship courses do require at minimum instructor approval to enroll. Students will be blocked from enrolling in any internship course without instructor approval.

If you have questions about how an internship course may fit into your degree plan, refer to your degree plan on the NSC webpage and reach out to your academic advisor to confirm eligibility and to discuss course planning and internship credits.

Internships available for academic credit (must be seeking enrollment in internship course for these opportunities)

Per college policy, NSC requires that any time a student completes a for-credit internship, there must be a contract in place between NSC and the internship employer. All the internships listed below have the required paperwork and are approved by the college for students to pursue for academic credit. If you wish to intern at a site that is not listed, you must get prior approval from the Internship Manager first.

Biology (BIOL 399)

Communications (COM 499)

Criminal Justice (CRJ 491)

Law, Government & Public Policy

Victim Services & Social Services 

Natural & Environmental Resource Science (NRES 416)

Psychology & Counseling (PSY 497/COU 497)

ABA / Autism Therapy Services

Mental Health Services

Victim Services & Social Services 

Visual Media (VIS 499)

  • Mass Media LLC
  • Design on Edge (Reno based)
  • Grafics Unlimited (Reno based)
  • StanCan Design (Reno based)
  • TMCC Marketing & Communications Department (Reno based)

Full List of Approved Internships (all disciplines)

Full List of Approved Internships 

Can my current job count as an internship for credit?

No. Your current job cannot count as an internship at NSC as an internship needs to be a new learning experience.

You may be able to intern at your current place of work if you are able to gain new experiences and skills through tasks and responsibilities that differ from the tasks and responsibilities of your employment. Even though interning with your current employer can be preferable in some cases, we always encourage students to try to secure an internship outside of their current place of employment. Interning with a new employer will allow you to see what it would be like to work for another type of employer, make new professional connections and strengthen your resume.

Instances where students wish to intern at their current place of work must be vetted through the appropriate internship faculty member and the Internship Manager in Career Services before they can be approved for any internship course.

The only time a student can complete an internship within the same organization that they are employed is if they meet the following requirements:

  • Duties/responsibilities of internship differ from current job to provide new skills that relate to career goals/align with academic major
  • Internship hours occur outside the confines of current job hours
  • The intern has a different supervisor for their internship than their current job*
  • The intern completes work in a different office/department/division from their current job*

* Not necessarily required, but will be examined on a case-by-case basis.

Steps to take to securing academic credit

It is recommended that students start this process 3-4 months in advance from when the semester they want their internship to take place to ensure you meet enrollment deadlines.

  1. Consider your career goals and interest areas
  2. Review the List of Approved Internships to identify sites of interest
  3. Have your resume and/or cover letter reviewed by Career Services
  4. Reach out and/or apply for internship positions at sites of interest
  5. Complete any necessary steps on the employer’s part (ex: they may have you do an interview or a background check)
  6. Once you have an internship secured, reach out to the professor teaching the appropriate internship class you wish to enroll in and the Internship Manager at kaytee.johns@nsc.edu
  7. If you get the OK from both the professor and Internship Manager, you will be granted permissions to enroll in the internship course
  8. You go in your student center and enroll in the course

Non-Credit Internships

What if I can't or don't want to receive academic credit for my internship?

You are not required to pursue academic credit for an internship experience as Liberal Arts & Studies student (Nursing & Education students see “School of Nursing Students” or “School of Education Students” dropdown), it is just highly recommended in most cases. If you are uncertain about if internship course is right for you or if you are eligible, we suggest you contact your academic advisor to explore your options.

If you do not take an internship course, you can still complete an internship, you just would not receive academic credit and it would not be recorded on your transcript. We highly recommend reporting your non-credit internship to the Career Services Internship Manager via our Non-Credit Internship Reporting Form. By informing Career Services of your internship, we will be able to provide you with support and assistance through your internship, should any issues arise.

It is important to note that some employers require their interns to receive academic credit for their internships. You should carefully read any eligibility requirements listed for an internship and inquire with an employer if you do not intend to receive academic credit for the internship in question.

Non-credit internship opportunities

This is not an exhaustive list – please see dropdown below for how you can find additional opportunities. Internships marked with an * are known to be paid positions. Please note that pay is not guaranteed; you are encouraged to speak with the organization to confirm if the internship you are applying for is still paid.

Business Administration/Communication

Biology/Environmental Resource Science

  • Coming soon.

Criminal Justice

Data Science

English

  • Coming soon.

Human Health Science/Allied Health Science/Pre-Nursing

  • Coming soon.

History/History Pre-Law

  • Coming soon.

Psychology

  • Coming soon.

Visual Media

Where do I find additional non-credit internship opportunities?

Use Handshake

Handshake is NSC’s online job and internship board, run by the Career Services Center. Many on and off-campus employers in the area and across the country utilize Handshake to opportunities for students. All NSC students and recent alumni already have a Handshake account. To log into Handshake:

  • Visit nsc.edu and click on the blue NSC Login button.
  • Enter your NSHE ID# and NSC password.
  • Click on the “Jobs” tab and then filter for internships.
  • Trouble logging in? Email career@nsc.edu.

Attend Career Services Center Events

Attending career-related events with professional guest speakers and employers is a great way to learn about internship opportunities and network with professionals. To view a list of upcoming career-related events hosted by the Career Services Center and within the local community, log into Handshake and click on the “Events” tab. To log into Handshake:

  • Visit nsc.edu. Click on the blue NSC Login button.
  • Enter your NSHE ID# and NSC password.
  • Click on the “Events” tab to view a list of upcoming career-related events. RSVP for events of interest to save your space and to receive reminder emails with event details.
  • Trouble logging in? Email career@nsc.edu.

Schedule an Appointment with the Internship Manager

The Internship Manager works in the Career Services Center and assists students who are interested in finding and securing internships.

Additional Ways to Search for Internships

  • Ask friends and/or family if they know of any companies that are offering internships.
  • Ask faculty if they know of any internship opportunities.
  • Attend local career fairs, employer recruiting events, and networking events.
  • Use online sites to network and search for opportunities such as LinkedIn or Internships.com.
  • Expand your network and connect with professionals in your areas of interest to seek advice. You can do this by attending events, getting involved in clubs/organizations, volunteering, working, or by simply reaching out to professionals in your area of interest and starting a conversation.

Report your non-credit internship for a chance to win prizes!

We highly recommend reporting your non-credit internship to the Career Services Internship Manager via our Non-Credit Internship Reporting Form. By informing Career Services of your internship, we will be able to provide you with support and assistance through your internship, should any issues arise. By reporting, you are also automatically entered in for a chance to win a prize pack valued at over $75! We choose up to 3 students each semester.

Specific Student Population Information

Undocumented Students

Students with DACA

Students who have DACA are eligible for most internships. With your DACA and SSN, you should be able to apply to any internship, as long as they do not state that you must be a citizen or permanent resident to apply (this is not very common, but may be seen with law-enforcement related internships or internships at various gov. offices/agencies).

Students without DACA

Students without DACA are also eligible to complete internships. While there may be some specific internships you are ineligible for, we still have some great opportunities available for you! Some things to consider when looking for opportunities include if they are paid, and if they require a background check.

More than likely, you will not be able to take part in paid internships as they usually require a SSN in order to be paid.

Additionally, you should be aware of any background check requirements. There are different types of background checks available, and not all require a SSN. Some may only require your name and home address. Please be advised that most internships related to law-enforcement or that work with public gov. agencies typically require a full-federal background check that must be completed with a SSN. If you see a background check listed as a requirement for an internship you want to apply to, it can be beneficial to ask the employer what type of information would be needed to complete the background check, and if there are alternative options for a background check if you feel comfortable doing so.

If you have questions about which internships you would be eligible to apply for, make sure to contact the Internship Manager.

Justice-Impacted/History of Criminal Conviction Students

Coming soon.

School of Nursing Students

If you are a student in the School of Nursing (both PT & FT tracks) your degree will require you to complete an experiential learning course as a part of your curriculum:

  • For Nursing, you will be required to complete clinical rotations for academic credit that take place in your last semester in the nursing program in NURS 484 Nursing Immersion- Professional Practice / Praxis (6 credits)

The aforementioned experiential learning courses function similarly to internships in that they provide hands-on experience in a healthcare setting before graduating. Students in any School of Nursing program are welcome to participate in an additional learning experience (such as an internship) to gain more experience. However, it is important to note that internships within healthcare or healthcare adjacent fields will often focus on case management, social work, administrative duties and the like. These experiences can still be valuable for students looking to gain a wider perspective on the healthcare field, but they will not provide direct patient care experience.

Direct patient care is typically only delegated to students who are working towards degrees/licensures/certifications that make them qualified to provide direct patient care- i.e. enrolled in NSC’s Nursing program.  SoN clinical rotations where students get direct patient care experience are facilitated through SoN and local community partners (hospitals) so that SoN can confirm enrollment in a Nursing program and confirm that those students have the necessary skills and certifications to provide direct patient care (ex: CNA, CPR).

Before considering internships, students in SON  programs should also be cognizant of their course load and personal commitments when considering completing an additional learning experience as internships can require you to work anywhere from 8-12 hours per week depending on the site.

In most cases, if you are looking to gain additional experience, we recommend that students seek out part-time jobs in their field or consider volunteer opportunities or reach out to employers to inquire about job shadowing, as some of these options may provide more flexibility for student’s schedules. If you are interested in learning more about volunteer opportunities or need help finding job opportunities, you can make an appointment with one of our Career Services staff here: www.calendly.com/nsccareer and select a 30 or 60 minute Career Advising Appointment.

School of Education Students

If you are a student in the School of Education (ALL programs) your degree will require you to complete an experiential learning course as a part of your curriculum.

  • For Education students, you will be required to student teach in your last semester in your education program. The course you take will depend on your education level and concentration:
    • EECE 491- Student Teaching in ECE
    •  EDEL 483-Elementary Supervised Student Teaching
    • EDSP 493-Supervised Internship in Special Education
    • EDSC 483-Secondary Supervised Teaching Internship
  • For Speech Pathology students, both in the bachelor’s and master’s level, you will be required to work with SPA clinicians in one of the following courses:
    • Bachelor’s Degree: SPA 441- Clinical Practicum
    • Master’s Degree: SPA 790- Practicum Externship or SPA 706- Advanced Practicum in Schools

The aforementioned experiential learning courses function similarly to internships in that they provide hands-on experience facilitated through academic faculty before graduating. Students in any School of Education program are welcome to participate in an additional learning experience (such as an internship) to gain more experience. However, it is important to note that internships within education or education adjacent fields will often focus on social work, behavioral services/education (including ABA services) administrative duties and the like. These experiences can still be valuable for students looking to gain a wider perspective on the education field, but will often not provide direct student interactions in a classroom setting.

Your direct interactions in providing curricular support for students in the classroom or providing individuals with speech therapy (SLP), will come from the curricular hands-on learning requirements for your degree listed above. Traditional internships often do not take place directly in a classroom setting or in directly providing speech therapy to individuals as these types of experiences require individuals to have have specific licensures/certifications or be enrolled in programs that lead towards licensures/certifications- i.e. NSC’s Education and SLP programs. These experiences are are facilitated through SoE and local community partners (such as CCSD) so that the SoE can confirm enrollment in an Education or SLP program and confirm that those students have the necessary skills and certifications to provide that level of support or care.

Students in SOE programs should also be cognizant of their course load and personal commitments when considering completing an additional learning experience as internships can require you to work anywhere from 8-12 hours per week depending on the site.

In most cases, if you are looking to gain additional experience, we recommend that students seek out part-time jobs in their field or consider volunteer opportunities or reach out to employers to inquire about job shadowing, as some of these options may provide more flexibility for student’s schedules. If you are interested in learning more about volunteer opportunities or need help finding job opportunities, you can make an appointment with one of our Career Services staff here: www.calendly.com/nsccareer and select a 30 or 60 minute Career Advising Appointment.

Alumni

In many cases, only current students are eligible for internships. While some employers will accept or recruit recent graduates, many employers will only offer internships to students who are still enrolled in courses. This is because employers want to offer these experiences that will complement classroom learning, provide a glimpse into that organization or career field, and be an experience to build up a resume before students graduate and pursue full-time work. If you are a current student, we highly encourage you to take advantage of internships while still enrolled, as the options after graduation are extremely limited. However, we do understand that sometimes completing an internship as a student is not feasible for a number of reasons.

Of the internship opportunities that may be available to alumni, they often require that you are 6 months or less out from your graduation date at the time you apply to be eligible. In some cases, it may even be less.

If you are an alumni who is interested in finding internship opportunities, please go to the “Finding & Applying for Internships” section to read more about where you may be able to find internship opportunities. It is important to note that you should carefully read any eligibility or applicant criteria before applying to ensure you are eligible as an alumni for any internship position. 

Successful Strategies for Internships

What do I need to prepare before applying to an internship?

Most internships will require at minimum a resume to apply. While internship applications can vary in what they require you to submit, you can almost always expect them to ask for a resume. In addition to a resume, some internships may ask for:

  • Cover letter
  • Official or unofficial transcripts
  • Letters of recommendation
  • References
  • Interview (after you apply)

It is important to look at any application requirements and application processes listed or reach out to the employer and inquire to ensure that you complete your application and the application process fully to be considered.

Once you find out what you will need to prepare before applying to the internship, we suggest making an appointment with Career Services. The Career Services Center can support students with all of the items mentioned above. To make an appointment with our office, please visit our Career Services webpage.

Tips & Tricks to make your internship process successful!

  1. Begin the process early! You should begin searching and applying for internship 3-4 months before you can expect your internship to begin.
  2. Don’t give up! Securing an internship is very similar to securing a job. It can often take a few “no’s” and a few months before you receive an offer.
  3. Don’t rely on just one strategy for finding internships. Most folks will only look online for opportunities, but many internships are shared through word-of-mouth. We always encourage students to talk to the Internship Manager about available opportunities, talk to their peers about internships they have completed, inquire with faculty about opportunities they know of, and reach out to others in their personal networks via social media. Utilizing multiple strategies in the internship process will usually yield the best results for students, and may even land them a position they never knew existed had they not made those further connections.
  4. Make sure your resume is up to date. A resume is often required to apply to most internship postings. An updated and professional resume is essential to sending a strong and positive first impression to employers.

Internship Search Safety Tips

As you conduct your internship search, remember to carefully evaluate all job postings, interviews, and offers. Unfortunately, there are scammers and criminals who post fraudulent job and internship postings in hopes to scam individuals for money and/or personal information. Read below to learn about job/internship search safety tips and common red flags of fraudulent postings.

Use common sense when applying for employment/internship opportunities.

  • Postings offering a job “guarantee” or that ask you to buy study materials, send money for certification or placement should be avoided. Legitimate organizations do not make guarantees or ask for payment to hire or train you.
  • If the position is offering a lot of money for very little work, it more than likely is a scam.
  • Be alert when position descriptions are vague, promotes mainly how much money you could make, and/or includes many spelling and grammatical errors.

Never cash a check for, or give any money to, an employer.

  • Don’t apply to job listings that use language such as “money transfers” or “wiring funds.”
  • Beware of check-cashing scams. If someone asks you to deposit a check or money order into your personal account and send money to another individual, don’t do it.
  • Do not agree to have funds or paychecks directly deposited into any accounts by a new employer. (Arrangements for direct deposit or paycheck should be made during your first day or week of actual employment on site – not before.)

Research the employer. Meet in-person at their place of business (if possible).

  • Research (i.e. Google) the employer’s physical address, phone number, and/or email address to be sure it is connected to an actual business organization. Research a company for legitimacy by visiting the Better Business Bureau (www.bbb.org) and/or Hoovers (www.hoovers.com).
  • Meet face-to-face with a potential employer. An in-person interview or informal chat will help you determine the employer’s intentions.

Do NOT give out personal information.

  • Do not give your personal bank account, PayPal account, or credit card information to a new employer. The only exception would be if you are being paid as an intern and you are receiving funds via direct deposit. However, if you do need to provide this information, never give it out over email or phone.
  • If requested, do not fax copies of your identification or Social Security number to an unknown person. Offer these documents to your employer only when you are physically at the place of employment.

Other Red Flags:

  • You are contacted via phone or email for a position you never applied to.
  • The employer contacts you by phone, however, there is no way to call them back. The number is not available or disconnected.

What to Do if You Are Already Involved in a Scam:

  • Contact the local police. Report the fraudulent employer to the local police, who may choose to conduct an investigation (regardless of whether the scam artist is local or in another state).
  • Contact your bank. If you sent money to a fraudulent employer and/or shared your personal banking information, contact your bank or credit card company immediately to protect the account and dispute the charges.
  • File a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). The FTC is the nation’s consumer protection agency, which collects complaints about companies, business practices, and identity theft. File a complaint by going to www.ftccomplaintassistant.gov or by calling the FTC at: 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357).
  • Contact the Career Services Center so we can review the position/employer and be informed about the job scam. Email career@nsc.edu.

Phone & email templates

Coming soon.

Still looking for more information on internships? Connect with a Career Advisor!

Email kaytee.johns@nsc.edu or schedule an appointment by clicking the “Schedule An Appointment” button below.

PLEASE READ BEFORE CLICKING BUTTON

When you click the button below, you will be redirected to our new scheduling system, Penji. When you click on the button, you will first enter your school domain; please enter students.nsc.edu. You will then be prompted to a single sign-on screen where you enter your NSHE ID# and password to schedule an appointment.

TD.US Internship Funding Program for TD.US Scholars

TheDream.US, in partnership with Nevada State College, will provide internship funds for Scholars with and without work authorization. These internships will enable TheDream.US Scholars to gain and demonstrate skills, explore career paths, and build their networks, as they are mentored by their Host Organization. 

If you are an undocumented student at Nevada State and have questions about other resources and support available for undocumented students, please visit our Undocumented Student Program (USP) website. The USP is housed within the office of Community, Equity, Diversity and Inclusion (CEDI).

 

Pilot Program Fall 2022 

In order to qualify for this program, students must be a current TD.US scholar attending Nevada State College for the Fall 2022 semester. Students must secure an unpaid internship prior to applying for funding towards their unpaid internship. Application opens on August 1, 2022 and will close September 11, 2022. This program is overseen in collaboration between the Career Services Center and the office of Community, Equity, Diversity and Inclusion (CEDI).

Eligibility

TD.US Scholar Eligibility

TD. US Scholar Eligibility Requirements 

  • Students must have secured an internship relevant to their major and/or career interests at the time of application 
  • Current TheDream.US Scholar 
  • Have a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher; and
  • Has a valid social security number (SSN) or individual tax identification number (ITIN). DACA is not required. 
    • Questions on SSN and ITINs? Contact Undocumented Programs Manager, Mariana at mariana.sarmiento@nsc.edu

Internship Eligibility Requirements

Internship Eligibility Requirements

Internship opportunities must: 

  • Provide between 40-200 hours of work between August 1, 2022 – December 31, 2022 
    • Internship can be remote, on-site or hybrid setting 
    • Student must at least begin completing internship hours by or before September 30, 2022
  • Take place at a host organization that is a non-profit organization, small business or start up that is unable to pay interns
  • Have a dedicated staff member from host organization that will serve as the intern’s supervisor and provide routine feedback and training 
  • Be educational in nature and focus on training and learning objectives related to the intern’s academic coursework and/or professional goals
    • *Nursing Clinicals and Education Student Teaching CANNOT count towards this funding. 

Need Help Finding and/or Applying to Internships?

Getting started

If you are unsure where you want to apply, we suggest making two (2) appointments with Career Services:

  • First Appointment: to identify possible internship opportunities that align with your major and/or professional goals
  • Second appointment: get your resume and possible cover letter reviewed before applying to internships

PRO TIP: One of the top reasons students lose out on internships is because they don’t take the time to get their application materials reviewed before they apply. Employers will often immediately disqualify intern applications that they can tell the student did not take the time to work on i.e. too many spelling errors, inconsistent formatting, missing key information, etc.

Before applying

If you already know where you are going to apply, we strongly recommend making at least one (1) appointment with Career Services to get your application materials reviewed.

PRO TIP: One of the top reasons students lose out on internships is because they don’t take the time to get their application materials reviewed before they apply. Employers will often immediately disqualify intern applications that they can tell the student did not take the time to work on i.e. too many spelling errors, inconsistent formatting, missing key information, etc.

Application Procedures

How to complete application

How to complete the application:

1. Go to the TD.US Parker Dewey webpage.

2. Log in to the Parker Dewey platform.

    • If you haven’t used Parker Dewey before, you will need to create an account.
      • When creating your account, you can use any email to set it up (does not have to be your student email).
      • Make sure when you are creating the profile to add TheDream.US affiliation when you are prompted. The option for TheDream.US should pop up when typed in the Affiliation search bar.
    • If you do already have an account, make sure you have selected TheDream.US as an affiliation on your profile.
      • To check or add this affiliation, once logged in, click on your name/profile icon in the top right corner and select Profile button from the dropdown menu.
      • Scroll down on the first page that opens up to the Affiliation section at the bottom.
      • Type in TheDream.US and select it when it pops up.
      • You should see TheDream.US box listed under your Affiliation section.

3. In Parker Dewey, scroll until you see TheDream.US Internship Funding Application – Nevada State College

4. Click on the Details button

5. Scroll down until you see the button that says APPLY FOR THS PROJECT

6. You will be required to answer about 15 questions related to your secured unpaid internship and why you should be selected for this opportunity. ** Make sure to carefully read ALL questions. One question will require you to upload written communication from the host organization offering you the internship to your profile (i.e. an offer letter or screenshot on a PDF of an acceptance email).

7. Make sure to click submit! You will be contacted directly regarding whether you were selected or not for this program.

If You Are Selected

Important payment information

Payment Procedures

  • Total payment will be determined prior to the start of experience and will be based off estimated total number of hours reported in the application. Payment will equate to approx. $20/hour.
  • Internship experiences that are at or below 99 estimated hours will be paid in 1 payment at completion of the experience. Internships that are at or above 100 hours ($2,000 payment or more) will be paid in 2 equal payments (one roughly halfway through experience; the last payment at end of experience). 
  • Payment will be facilitated through a third-party vendor, Parker Dewey, whom both TD.US and NSC work with. Students will need to provide their SSN or ITIN if they are selected in order to receive payment.
  • Payment can be provided as a check or direct deposit.
  • Income earned through projects should be reported on your tax return as self-employment income.  If you earn more than $600 from projects during the year, Parker Dewey will send you a 1099 to report on your tax return. You should receive the 1099 by March each year.  The IRS has additional guidance for managing taxes for your gig work. Please note that this resource is not professional advice. If you have any questions about your taxes or your deductions, consider hiring an accountant or ask a tax professional.

Additional program requirements

Additional Program Requirements

  • During the course of the internship, you will be required to meet with one of the staff members overseeing this program for check-ins (Kaytee or Mariana).
  • You will complete a Post Micro-Internship Survey from Parker Dewey which will be required in order to receive initial/final payment.

Important Considerations:

Considerations

Considerations

  • Students do not need DACA to apply for this funding, but do need a valid SSN or ITIN in order to receive payment.
  • Income earned through projects should be reported on your tax return as self-employment income.  If you earn more than $600 from projects during the year, Parker Dewey will send you a 1099 to report on your tax return. You should receive the 1099 by March each year.  The IRS has additional guidance for managing taxes for your gig work. Please note that this resource is not professional advice. If you have any questions about your taxes or your deductions, consider hiring an accountant or ask a tax professional.
  • The funds from this program will not be applied directly to your student account. They will be payed out as a direct deposit to a bank account of your choosing or sent as a check so that you can spend the funds however you choose.
  • Funds are not guaranteed. All applications will be reviewed prior to decisions being sent out.

Timeline

Program and application timeline

  • Applications Open: August 1, 2022
  • Applications Due: September 11, 2022
  • Application Review: September 12- September 14, 2022
  • Applicants Notified: September 14, 2022
  • *Deadline for Internship to Begin: September 30, 2022 (students may start hours before this date)
  • Mid Semester Check-In: October 2022
  • End of Semester Check-In: December 2022
  • *Deadline for Internship to End: December 31, 2022 (students must complete all internship hours by this date)

Still have questions? Contact the Undocumented Program Manager, Mariana, at Mariana.Sarmiento@nsc.edu or the Interim Director of Career Services, Kaytee, at Kaytee.johns@nsc.edu

Internship Information for Employers

If you have further questions, or want to connect with the Internship Manager to discuss a future partnership, please email Kaytee at kaytee.johns@nsc.edu.

Traditional Internships

Prospective Employer Partners

General overview of NSC's Internship Program

Our Internship Program at NSC supports students who pursue internships with and without academic credit. The Internship Program primarily serves students in our College of Liberal Arts, Science and Business which houses 15+ major and 25+ minor degree programs.

Currently, our College of Liberal Arts, Science and Business offers internship courses which allow students to receive academic credit for their internships in 8 programs:

  • Biology
  • Business Administration
  • Communication
  • Criminal Justice
  • History/ History Pre-Law (not currently active)
  • Interpreting ASL
  • Environmental & Resource Science
  • Psychology
  • Visual Media

LASB offers additional degree programs to the ones listed above. To view the full list of degree options, please visit: https://nsc.edu/academics/degrees-and-programs/. 

Students who do not want to or are unable to receive academic credit for an internship are still allowed to complete an internship. Though we highly recommend students receive credit, we know that it is not possible in some cases. However, most students who complete an internship while enrolled at NSC do choose to receive academic credit. In these cases, an internship site must be approved by NSC and Career Services before a student can intern at a site and receive credit. Please see “Becoming an NSC internship partner” for more information on how to get your site and internship opportunities approved for academic credit.

Internship definition and guidelines

To ensure that an experience—whether it is a traditional internship or one conducted remotely or virtually—is educational, and thus eligible to be considered a legitimate internship by the National Association of Colleges & Employers definition, all the following criteria must be met:

  • The experience must be an extension of the classroom: a learning experience that provides for applying the knowledge gained in the classroom. It must not be simply to advance the operations of the employer or be the work that a regular employee would routinely perform.
  • The skills or knowledge learned must be transferable to other employment settings.
  • The experience has a defined beginning and end, and a job description with desired qualifications.
  • There are clearly defined learning objectives/goals related to the professional goals of the student’s academic coursework.
  • There is supervision by a professional with expertise and educational and/or professional background in the field of the experience.
  • There is routine feedback by the experienced supervisor. 
  • There are resources, equipment, and facilities provided by the host employer that support learning objectives/goals.

In addition to the definition from NACE, other important details that help to create a quality internship program include:

  • Orientation and training for the intern
  • Opportunity to network and meet colleagues and organizational leadership
  • Intern is provided specific project/responsibilities at the start of the internship

Internship programs under the Fair Labor Standards Act

In 2018 the Department of Labor established a new “primary beneficiary test” with FLSA Fact Sheet #71 that helps to determine whether interns and students working for “for-profit” employers are entitled to minimum wages and overtime pay under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).1

Background
The FLSA requires “for-profit” employers to pay employees for their work. Interns and students, however, may not be “employees” under the FLSA—in which case the FLSA does not require compensation for their work.

The Test for Unpaid Interns and Students
Courts have used the “primary beneficiary test” to determine whether an intern or student is, in fact, an employee under the FLSA.2 In short, this test allows courts to examine the “economic reality” of the intern-employer relationship to determine which party is the “primary beneficiary” of the relationship. Courts have identified the following seven factors as part of the test:

  1. The extent to which the intern and the employer clearly understand that there is no expectation of compensation. Any promise of compensation, express or implied, suggests that the intern is an employee—and vice versa.
  2. The extent to which the internship provides training that would be similar to that which would be given in an educational environment, including the clinical and other hands-on training provided by educational institutions.
  3. The extent to which the internship is tied to the intern’s formal education program by integrated coursework or the receipt of academic credit.
  4. The extent to which the internship accommodates the intern’s academic commitments by corresponding to the academic calendar.
  5. The extent to which the internship’s duration is limited to the period in which the internship provides the intern with beneficial learning.
  6. The extent to which the intern’s work complements, rather than displaces, the work of paid employees while providing significant educational benefits to the intern.
  7. The extent to which the intern and the employer understand that the internship is conducted without entitlement to a paid job at the conclusion of the internship.

Courts have described the “primary beneficiary test” as a flexible test, and no single factor is determinative. Accordingly, whether an intern or student is an employee under the FLSA necessarily depends on the unique circumstances of each case.

If analysis of these circumstances reveals that an intern or student is actually an employee, then he or she is entitled to both minimum wage and overtime pay under the FLSA. On the other hand, if the analysis confirms that the intern or student is not an employee, then he or she is not entitled to either minimum wage or overtime pay under the FLSA.

Where to Obtain Additional Information
This publication is for general information and is not a regulation. For additional information, visit the Wage and Hour Division Website: http://www.wagehour.dol.gov.

Footnotes

1 – The FLSA exempts certain people who volunteer to perform services for a state or local government agency or who volunteer for humanitarian purposes for non-profit food banks. WHD also recognizes an exception for individuals who volunteer their time, freely and without anticipation of compensation, for religious, charitable, civic, or humanitarian purposes to non-profit organizations. Unpaid internships for public sector and non-profit charitable organizations, where the intern volunteers without expectation of compensation, are generally permissible.

Becoming an internship for-credit employer partner

Step 1: Read through the sections above to learn about NSC’s Internship Program and student body.

Step 2: Set a meeting with the Internship Manager. The Internship Manager will ask you specific questions related to your opportunity including:

  • role description
  • intern duties/responsibilities
  • minimum or desired qualifications
  • approximate start and end date
  • learning goals/objectives for intern
  • who would supervisor interns

It will be important that you have these items established or have an outline of the items in order for your site to be considered under best practice internship program standards.

Step 3: If the Internship Manager feels that your internship opportunity meets program standards and would be applicable for our student population, you would work with the Internship Manager to execute our  Internship Site Agreement between your organization and NSC. Students are not allowed to intern and receive academic credit at any site without a completed Internship Site Agreement in place. We require this agreement be completed before your internship opportunity can be shared out to students and faculty/staff partners. Please note that some of the terms outlined in the Internship Site Agreement are negotiable. Any suggested changes must be approved by the NSC Contracts Team before final signatures can be obtained.

*As previously mentioned in “Overview of NSC’s Internship Program”, most of our student pursue internships for academic credit. Thus, if possible for your organization, completing the Internship Site Agreement will maximize your opportunities from our student body.

Step 4: If both your organization and NSC agree to the terms of the Internship Site Agreement and sign off, the Internship Manager will reach out to confirm that your site is approved for our students for academic credit.

Step 5: The Internship Manager will finalize the details and share your opportunity out with students and internship faculty.

Can I still share my internship with your students even if I don't become a for-credit employer internship partner?

Yes, you can. Even if we are unable to partner with you to offer your internship for credit to our students, you can still share your internship opportunity out to NSC students, as long as the position meets our criteria.

Emailing the Internship Manager

You can email your internship posting to the Internship Manager, at kaytee.johns@nsc.edu. If your position meets our criteria, we will share the position out with our students via email, social media and on-campus flyers when possible.

Posting to Handshake Instructions

Handshake is the first place we tell students to go when looking for jobs or internships.

*When you create an account and connect to NSC, our office goes through and reviews all employers before allowing them to post jobs or internships for our students. Please note that this approval process may take 3-5 business days. Your job/internship post will not be visible until NSC Career Services has approved your account.

Creating an account is free for all employers, and once you have done so, your internship post will be accessible to our 7,200+ students and alumni. Through Handshake, employers and their staff can:

  • Post vacancies for full-time positions, part-time positions, and internship opportunities
  • Advertise hiring and recruitment events
  • Manage ALL college campus recruiting efforts with Handshake at no cost (Handshake works with 800+ colleges and universities across the country; UNLV, UNR, and CSN also use Handshake)
  • Handle college recruiting needs via a mobile experience – update job postings, view applicants, and more all while on the go
  • View and register for upcoming NSC Career Fairs and events
  • View student profiles and message student talent within Handshake about your opportunities

Please again note that there is NO COST to post jobs/internships and events on Handshake.

Once you have completed the steps in the Handshake Employer User Guide you will be listed as a contact in our database and will receive notifications about career-related events at NSC and can proactively reach out to students on Handshake who attend NSC. You must go through ALL the steps listed in the Employer User Guide to set up your account and have it approved by our team before any of your internship positions will be viewable to our students. Please allow us up to 10 business days to approve your account at NSC.

Should you need assistance navigating Handshake, please refer to Handshake Support Center (this site offers helpful 2-minute training videos and articles with screenshots) at https://support.joinhandshake.com.

Connecting with Nursing, Teacher Education and Speech Language Pathology Students

If you are looking to offer hands-on learning opportunities that only nursing, teacher education or speech pathology students are qualified for, and/or looking to offer hands-on learning opportunities that are specifically tailored for students in nursing, teacher education or speech language pathology programs, please see the section “Education & Nursing Student Information”.

Current Employer Partners

How do I share my internship opportunity with students?

Post to Handshake

All employers who wish to share internships with NSC students should first create an account through Handshake, our online job/internship board.  Creating an account is free for all employers, and once you have done so, your internship post will be accessible to our 7,200+ students and alumni.

Through Handshake, employers and their staff can:

  • Post vacancies for full-time positions, part-time positions, and internship opportunities
  • Advertise hiring and recruitment events
  • Manage ALL college campus recruiting efforts with Handshake at no cost (Handshake works with 800+ colleges and universities across the country; UNLV, UNR, and CSN also use Handshake)
  • Handle college recruiting needs via a mobile experience – update job postings, view applicants, and more all while on the go
  • View and register for upcoming NSC Career Fairs and events
  • View student profiles and message student talent within Handshake about your opportunities

Please again note that there is NO COST to post jobs/internships and events on Handshake.

Once you have completed the steps in the Handshake Employer User Guide you will be listed as a contact in our database and will receive notifications about career-related events at NSC and can proactively reach out to students on Handshake who attend NSC. You must go through ALL the steps listed in the Employer User Guide to set up your account and have it approved by our team before any of your internship positions will be viewable to our students. Please allow us up to 10 business days to approve your account at NSC.

Should you need assistance navigating Handshake, please refer to Handshake Support Center (this site offers helpful 2-minute training videos and articles with screenshots) at https://support.joinhandshake.com.

Share Directly with Internship Manager

Once you set up your Handshake account and post your internship, you can share your position with our Internship Manager.

The Internship Manager can then share your opportunity:

  • In our monthly Career Services Newsletter which goes to all students and staff
  • In our quarterly Internship Digest which goes to all students
  • With academic faculty to share in their courses
  • On our Career Services’ social media accounts (@nsccareer on all platforms)
  • In 1:1 student internship advising appointments

You must contact the Internship Manager directly if you want your internship position marketed/shared out via the aforementioned channels. Due to the high volume of marketing requests we receive, please note that we cannot guarantee when or if your request can be accommodated.

Participate in Campus Career Events

Every semester the Career Services office at NSC offers employers opportunities to participate in events both on-campus and virtually. Employers can engage with our students directly through the following events:

  • In-person tabling in student center
  • Career Fair (occurs yearly in the Spring)
  • Virtual or In-person information/recruiting sessions
  • In-classroom information sessions or presentations (it is up to individual faculty to approve and accommodate any employer events in their classroom)

If you wish to participate in any of our events and get connected to our students to share our your internship opportunities, please contact our Coordinator of Employer Relations, Zak Kicenski at zachary.kicenski@nsc.edu. Our office schedules events 3-4 months prior to the start of the semester.

If you have created a Handshake account, you will automatically be put on our list of employer contacts and will receive communication from our office regarding opportunities to participate in career-related events on campus each semester.

Guidelines for posting or sharing internships

In order to ensure that prospective students have a good understanding of your internship experience and to ensure that employers are accurately prepared to take on an intern, we ask that employers include the following information below when posting or sharing internship opportunities:

  • Brief description of your organization and the responsibilities of the internship
  • Preferred or required qualifications
  • Work logistics (hours per week, organization operating hours,  wage, etc.)
  • Application process
  • Learning opportunities
  • Any background check or drug testing requirements
  • Any citizenship or immigration status requirements

Tips for better engagement with your internship postings on Handshake

Sometimes employers are concerned when they see little engagement with their internship postings. There can be a few reasons for this:

  • Your internship post or position was up for a short period of time. We always recommend leaving your posting open for around a month if possible. Oftentimes, students will need to prepare their application materials before applying, and that process can take some time if they are also busy with school and other personal commitments. Unlike traditional employment, there are a lot of factors that come into play on whether a student will decide to apply for an internship. Leaving the internship posting up longer also allows students the time to weigh their options and see if they can make it work within their schedule. Because of these factors and others, employers who only leave their posts up for sometimes 2 weeks or less often see very low application numbers.
  • The timing of your posting/advertising. Posting too far in advance or too late can hinder the number of applications you get. We typically recommend that employers post their internship opportunities anywhere from 1.5-4 months in advance from when you would want an intern to begin their role. If you post earlier than this, many students are unable to consider internships that far ahead since their schedules change semester to semester. Additionally, posting too late will leave you with few interested students, since most will have their internships secured anywhere from 1-3 months before the internship will begin.
  • The details of  the internship. At NSC we are working to educate our students on avoiding scams in employment applications, which also extends to internships. Often, if your post or role description and duties are too vague, students will not apply either out of fear of scams or just not fully understanding what the role entails.

This list is meant to give employers some understanding of how they can make their internship opportunities better stand-out to students and also maximize the opportunities for applicants. This is not an exhaustive list.

If you want to continue to host NSC student interns but are worried about low engagement, contact the Internship Manager to discuss possible solutions.

Education & Nursing Student Information

Nursing

Students in the school of nursing are required to complete hands-on learning as a part of their curriculum through clinical experiences, where they support current registered nurses in treating and caring for patients. Clinicals are different than internships in that they help provide medical support in a healthcare setting. While internships may occur in a healthcare setting, interns are not allowed to provide medical support or care. Nursing students also have different requirements when it comes to clinical experiences, such as: how long they spend at their clinical sites, healthcare workplace expectations (ex: providing vaccination records), and the type of supervision they receive during their internship (nursing students work with a experienced practitioner).

If you believe that your hands-on learning opportunity could be a match for a nursing clinical experience, you should contact the School of Nursing’s Interim Director of Clinical Partnerships Michael Johnson at michael.johnson@nsc.edu to discuss starting a clinical partnership between your organization and NSC.

Teacher Education

Field experiences are a requirement of all undergraduate education majors. ALL education majors in Nevada State College Teacher Preparation Program must participate in a planned series of field experiences as an integral part of their training. Field experiences begin with the first education course and culminate with student teaching. Student teaching is different than an internship in that student teachers are tasked with working with students in a K-12 classroom by preparing educational lesson plans, implementing lesson plans, and supporting their cooperating teacher (supervise, model, guide and evaluate teacher candidates in order to assist with the development of their teaching skills).

If you are interested in discussing a potential partnership between your organization and our teacher education students, please contact Melanie Murray at melanie.murray@nsc.edu.

Speech Language Pathology

NSC offers both a bachelorette and master’s degree in Speech Language Pathology. Both the undergrad and graduate programs are housing within our School of Education.

In both undergrad and grad programs, students are required to complete a clinical practicum, advanced practicum, or practicum externship. They all differ from internships in that they require students to provide assessment and treatment to children and adults with a variety of communicative disorders. Additionally, the students gradually assume supervised responsibility of the students assigned to their master clinician’s caseload.

If you are interested in discussing a potential partnership between your organization and our speech language pathology students, please contact Angel Ball at angel.ball@nsc.edu.

Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Best Practices

Recruiting a diverse student body

Below are strategies to engage with diverse students and showcase your organization’s dedication to diversity and inclusion.

Review Your Hiring Processes

  • Post open positions in Handshake to ensure opportunities are accessible to all students. A best practice to support diversity and equity is to post all positions to Handshake to ensure all students have equal access.
  • Write position descriptions with inclusive language.
  • Evaluate whether your processes increase barriers to any population. For example, some interview technology is challenging to individuals with disabilities. Or, if you require a full background check, that often disqualifies many students who have immigrated.
  • Reflect on which qualifications are truly required in order for an intern to adequately complete the internship, which are preferred, and which could be taught to the intern upon hire. Interns should not be expected to have the same level of skill as an employee as they are there to further develop those skills for future employment.

Acknowledge the Impact of Privilege

Try to assess the potential of the individual. Some students have responsibilities that affect their ability to be involved in student organizations, have internships or maintain high grades.

  • Review required qualifications to ensure they reflect the abilities of our students and college students generally, such as specific# of years of experience or high proficiency in a skill. Because NSC serves a high population of first-generation and DACA/Undocumented students, they may have had previous barriers to other hands-on learning opportunities such as internships or jobs.
  • Make compensation competitive, transparent and equitable.
  • Support scholarships and funding for internship programs. Contact the Career Services Center to see how you can help support the needs of our students.

Connect with Students One-On-One

NSC is unable to provide student lists to external audiences, which would violate FERPA policies and not considered a best practice by the Ethical and Legal Standards of the National Association of Colleges & Employers. We recommend you:

  • Create robust personal profiles on Handshake LinkedIn and to tell your company’s story and include involvement in diversity and inclusion efforts. Encourage those in your organization to do the same.
  • Respond timely when contacted by a student and, if you are not able to give your time now, suggest other professionals that could help.
  • Have a two-way conversation, sharing your background and advice, getting to know the student and offering ideas.

Consider Your Brand

Ensure your organization’s presence consistently reflects your commitment and support of diversity and inclusion.

  • Include a statement or additional content in your marketing materials that defines how diversity and inclusion supports your organization’s mission.
  • Highlight your affinity/employee resource groups. If possible, beyond listing them, describe some of their activities or feature them within your news stories to show how people in your organization connect with each other.
  • Join national organizations that support diverse populations and/or be involved in committees within general associations or chambers of commerce.
  • Provide support and mentorship to new interns and employees to ensure they are successful in their roles and able to serve as ambassadors for your organization

Micro-Internships

More information to come Spring 2023.

Internship Information for Faculty

More information to come Summer 2022.

Student Intern Testimonials

Percy Leal, Criminal Justice Major, Crisis Advocate Intern at SafeNest [SU 21]

“[During my internship, I was] responsible for going out on-call to be on scene with domestic violence victims in their time of need. I also collaborated with other advocates to provide the most effective assistance & resources. [I would definitely recommend SafeNest to other students interested];  It is really unique experience to go out in the field as an intern, and learn from your peers in a quickly evolving field such as victim advocacy.”

Jenna Russel, Business Admin Major, Project Management Intern at CreditOne [FA 21]

“[During my internship] one of my projects was adding streaming to our credit card rewards for our customers, it got approved by the CMO and will be seen by all our customers! I also got to update marketing language, create internal focus groups, and more. I [have enjoyed] building connections with people and learning about different departments to expand my knowledge.”

Briahnna Carrera, Human Health Science Major, Research Intern at DRI [SU 21]

“[During my internship] I worked on a project for NASA where we studied the microbiome onboard the International Space Station. I also assisted on a project that dealt with developing standards for the quantification of environmental DNA. I enjoyed being able to form professional relationships and getting to do something that gets my name out there, especially in such a challenging field of work.”

Christina Paris, Deaf Studies Major, Interpreting Intern at CCSD [SP 22]

“[During my internship] I learned how to communicate with elementary level students both Deaf and hearing, meet professional standards in a classroom setting as an interpreter, [and] build relationships with current school district interpreters. [I really enjoyed getting to] build trust with students to make sure they knew I was there to support them.”